Harvard Referencing is one of the most common areas that trip students up and result in loss of valuable marks. Make sure your referencing is done in the official Harvard style with this simple guide:

In-text Citations – Harvard Referencing Style

When you are making direct reference to a text, whether it be a quote or a mention of some form, you need to reference this both in the bibliography AND in the text itself.

Referencing in-text looks a little like this:

“Quote” (Surname, 2012).

Or

Theory reference (Surname and Surname, 2015)

The in-text citation should include the surname of the person(s) being quoted and the year of the publication being cited.

Listing Referenced Publications – Harvard Referencing Style

At the end of your work, you will be requested to create a references list, showing all references that you cited directly in the text. Any wider reading on the topic that you did not directly reference in the work should be listed as a bibliography.

The standard format for creating a reference for a text under the Harvard Referencing rules is as follows:

Surname, First initial. (Year published). Title. Edition. (Edition only needs to be included if there are multiple editions in circulation) City published: Publisher, Page(s).

Referencing Multiple Authors – Harvard Referencing Style

When referencing a text that has more than one author, the format changes slightly. For two authors, it would look like this:

Surname, First initial. and Surname, First Initial. (Year published). Title. Edition. (Edition only needs to be included if there are multiple editions in circulation) City published: Publisher, Page(s).

For more than two authors, it would look like this:

Surname, First initial., Surname, First Initial., and Surname, First Initial. (Year published). Title. Edition. (Edition only needs to be included if there are multiple editions in circulation) City published: Publisher, Page(s).

 

Referencing/Citing Chapters of Edited Books – Harvard Referencing Style

When citing a chapter of an edited book, the format would look like this:

Last name, First initial. (Year published). Chapter title. In: First initial. Last name, ed., Book Title, 1st ed. City: Publisher, Page(s).

Please note: When citing an edited book, the edition is displayed even if it is a first edition.

Referncing/Citing Print Journal Articles – Harvard Referencing Style

When citing a print journal or trade publication (only print, see further on in this article for online references), the reference should be structured like this:

Last name, First initial. (Year published). Article title. Journal or Magazine, Volume (Issue), Page(s).

 

Referencing/Citing Print Newspaper Articles – Harvard Referencing Style

When citing a newspaper article (only print, see further on in this article for online references), the reference should be structured like this:

Last name, First initial. (Year published). Article title. Newspaper, Page(s).

 

Referencing/Citing Materials Found Online – Harvard Referencing Style

Referencing resources found online is a little different to print.

Journal:

Last name, First initial. (Year published). Article Title. Journal or Magazine,

[online] Volume(Issue), pages. Available at: URL [Accessed Day Mo. Year].

Newspaper:

Last name, First initial. (Year published). Article title. Newspaper, [online] pages. Available at: url [Accessed Day Mo. Year].

Website:

Last name, First initial (Year published). Page title. [online] Website name. Available at: URL [Accessed Day Mo. Year].

Where no author name is given or known, simply put the website name first.

E-Books and PDFs:

Last name, First initial. (Year published). Title. Edition. [format] City: Publisher, page(s). Available at: URL [Accessed Day Mo. Year].

Blogs:

Last name, First initial. (Year published). Post title. [Blog] Blog name. Available at: URL [Accessed Day Mo. Year].

Emails:

Sender’s Last name, First initial. (Year published). Subject Line of Email. [email].

Images or videos:

Last name, First initial. OR Corporate Author. (Year published). Title/description. [format] Available at: URL [Accessed Day Mo. Year].

 

If you are unsure about how to reference something, you can contact your personal assignment tutor or send us a message via your preferred social media channel (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn).